Posts Tagged "guest"

Harbour Con-Fusion 2013

Posted by on Aug 7, 2013 in Life in Writing | 0 comments

Harbour Con-Fusion 2013

A picture of me with my table-neighbour Darren Hann. This past weekend, I had a rare opportunity: I was invited to attend a convention to do nothing but promote myself. I set out to do just that and, of course, to meet new people. Meeting new people was not only a goal, but also a necessity, as it turned out. On day one, I knew only a small handful of attendees. Did I ever meet a friendly group of people! All the other guests, it seemed, were just as willing to meet new people as I was, and they all went out of their way to introduce themselves to me at some point or another. It’s always fascinating, to me, when a group of creators are placed into a room together. It seems to me that they are always working on various projects and, at this event in particular, seemed to have a keen interest in what everyone else was doing. I spent the weekend collecting business cards and discussing works in progress, as well as swapping notes, resources, and suggesting collaborations. It’s hard to believe all of this came from the lot of us meeting at a sci-fi/horror/fantasy/anime/gaming/etc. convention, but there you have it–sometimes when creators meet, friendships are inevitable! It was nice to see such a supportive group, as well. I ended up doing book trades with 3 guests who were interested in my book and had books of their own. I had the opportunity to run a panel on publishing and self-publishing with Matthieu Gallant, who was one of the authors I book-swapped with. I had great conversations with illustrator and comic artist Sandy Carruthers about his work, and was the lucky table neighbour to independent filmmaker and outstandingly friendly Trekkie Darren Hann. I got to spend time hanging out and having a couple of drinks with the guys of Geeks vs. Nerds, in particular fellow writer Larry Gent. Artist (and fellow Daft Punk fan) AndrĂ© Myette was a couple of tables down on the first day, and we had some great chats as well. Aside from the connections I made, I want to give a shout out to Drakon Designs and Blind Leviathan for their lovely tables! Drakon did some beautiful facepainting on attendees this weekend, and Blind Leviathan was selling everything Lon Lon Milk pendants to Companion Cube earrings. Being the huge zombie fanatic that I am, I got some bottled zombie virus. Obviously. I should mention I got numerous StreetPasses as well, and compliments about my special edition Legend of Zelda 3DS. Maybe I didn’t need to mention that. Whatever. On the third day, the moon crashed into Termina I held a small panel about events planning and running your own event or meetup. It was attended by only 2, but I had held the same panel at Animaritime last month and had a good turnout there. I’m going to keep working on expanding the panel, particularly with feedback I’ve been receiving about it, and hope to turn it into a PowerPoint presentation so I can spread it even further. Giving panels is always interesting because not only do the attendees learn something, but quite often the person or people holding the panel will learn, as well. All in all, I had a fantastic weekend, and I managed to sell out of all printed copies of Hub City Survival! Amazing! I also managed to get a lot of work done on Retail Hell, the webcomic I am writing. I was surrounded by so many talented people all weekend that it was hard not to be inspired to work. I won’t be drawing the comic myself, and am looking for an artist. If you’re interested in the project, send me an e-mail! I’ll likely be throwing some sketches or other tidbits up here before long. Right now, I’m looking for a new home for HCS because my print-on-demand publisher, Lightning Demand Press, is currently isn’t printing due to a flood. As well, I am working on my new novel with the working title A Couple...

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Greetings from Harbour Con!

Posted by on Aug 2, 2013 in Life in Writing | 0 comments

Greetings from Harbour Con! I’m a guest at this year’s Harbour Con-Fusion. If you’re there now, chances are you’ve already been by my table. If not, well, come say hi! I’ve put out a call for game devs over at thisindiegameblog as well.  I’ll be live tweeting throughout the weekend, so check me out on @KCooperWriting. Enjoy the event! Please follow and like...

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Goodbye to an old friend.

Posted by on Oct 25, 2011 in Life in Writing | 0 comments

Goodbye to an old friend.

Losing family isn’t easy. It doesn’t matter what relation they are to you: if they are gone, they leave behind a hole in your heart that can never really be filled up again. Not all family members are blood family. In fact, not all of them are even human. Yesterday, we lost a very dear family member: our cat, Jake (short for Jaqueline), who had been with us for fifteen years. She was old, and her heart couldn’t take the strain anymore. There was nothing we could do and she wasn’t in pain, she was just weak. So, Mom and Dad brought her home for the last time. She died very quietly and peacefully yesterday morning, to the sound of water from the open window. We buried her later that day in Alma, near a spot by our house where she used to go mousing. She was an indoor-outdoor cat, and she loved to hunt. She also loved us. Jake was very much a people cat. Her best friend was my father, whose nose she would bat with her paw in the morning to wake him up. She would follow him everywhere like a loyal dog and would scold him if he left for too long. She had a very big personality and was vocal; Jake’s thoughts were never a question, and she certainly didn’t need any words to let her opinions be heard. I’ll never forget the last night I saw her. It was just the other night, in fact, after they had brought her home from the vet. She was so weak, and she couldn’t move more than a few steps without getting tired. I approached her and saw her lying in her basket, staring off in the distance. When she heard my footfalls, her head popped out of the basket to meet my eyes. She greeted me with one of her classic meows, as if to say “You’re here! You came! I’m so glad to see you!”, and she didn’t sound hoarse at all, even though she was so weak. She didn’t give any hint to how tired she was with those meows. They sounded reminiscent to the older days, when I would come home from school or work or university, and she would greet me the same way. I patted her and she gave the same happy purrs she would when she was healthy. I’ll miss the sound of her purring. It was how I could tell which cat had just jumped on the foot of my bed when it was dark. Her brother, Mira, didn’t have quite as distinct a purr as Jake’s. Mira left us many years ago, a very sick cat. Jake was healthy up until about a month ago, when her heart started to fail her. She was responsive until the end, though, and her eyes would dart about wide and alert the whole time, as if she didn’t want to miss a moment of it. Jake wasn’t just family, she was a friend. She always knew me, even when I left for many months for university, and always greeted me the same way when she saw me: the same as when she saw me the other night. Some people would think it strange to mourn the loss of a pet so strongly, but I don’t believe that. You don’t need words to build a lasting bond. You don’t need to speak the same language to miss the sound of someone’s voice, or to be understood. In fact, sometimes the lack of language makes the communication that much stronger. It eliminates the need for words altogether. Sometimes it can make the bond that much deeper. So, thank you, Jake. Thank you for being a friend. Thank you for always being so vocal. And thank you, especially, for holding on until we could see you at the very end, and purring the whole time. Thank you for that one last fond memory I have and will never forget. To finish, I’m going to add in a poem that my father, Allan Cooper,...

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