Posts Tagged "novel"

Mushroom and Anchovy press release

Posted by on Jul 8, 2017 in Components of other posts | 0 comments

Mushroom and Anchovy press release

Local Writer K. M. Cooper’s Next Book, Mushroom and Anchovy, in the Works FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE JUNE 29 2017, MONCTON, NB – Local writer K. M. Cooper, author of Moncton-based zombie novella Hub City Survival, is currently seeking to get her next book published. Mushroom and Anchovy, a three-part steampunk adventure novel, is currently being funded through Inkshares, a book-specific crowdfunding platform that professionally publishes books through a preorder system. Mushroom and Anchovy follows the journeys of Patricia “Anchovy” Finnigan and Vladimir “Mushroom” Kalkov, professional adventurers. Their adventuring company, the Panzerotti Group, organizes hunts and adventures to locate fabled or lost items. Mushroom and Anchovy work together for the first time to locate jewels, but find a lot more. When a fellow agent is murdered, they have to learn to work together, and fast. Especially since anything can happen in a cursed cave… Inkshares is a crowdfunding platform that helps writers with interested audiences get professionally published. At 250 preorders, the book will receive a light publishing package, complete with some editing and digital distribution, and at 750, a full package, including graphic and cover design, as well as promotion and distribution to brick and mortar bookstores. The novel is also entered in the Launchpad contest, which seeks new ideas and new author voices in the publishing and entertainment worlds. Placing in the top three of this contest will also guarantee Mushroom and Anchovy’s publication. A number of well-known producers are analyzing the submissions. More information is available for the Launchpad Contest at http://www.tbhlaunchpad.com. Ebooks are available for preorder at $10 USD, and print copies for $20 USD, through Inkshares at https://www.inkshares.com/books/mushroom-and-anchovy. Readers can also enjoy the first three chapters at no charge at that link. The campaign will be going until early September, after which point the project will receive publication if the 250-750 goal is met. Cooper can be reached at kmcooper.ca@gmail.com for further information. ### Please follow and like...

Read More

The case for self-publishing

Posted by on May 19, 2017 in Life in Writing | 0 comments

  Self-publishing is a bit of a polarizing topic. It does certainly have some shortcomings, but I feel that a lot of good writing gets overlooked due to its perceived stigma. I self-published my novella Hub City Survival six years ago. Would I have done things a little differently today? Absolutely–I don’t think anyone can say they didn’t make mistakes in their time, especially with a six-year gap in between. There are scenes I would have re-written altogether, there’s dialogue I would have scrapped and I certainly would hired someone to smash it down with a hammer. But I didn’t, and I’m okay with that. Here’s why: Hub City Survival wasn’t even supposed to get published. In fact, it just kind of popped out one day. I started writing it on DeviantArt and quickly gained a small following. It was a short project. As it gained popularity and reached its conclusion, I decided I wasn’t done with it, so I decided to compile it and sell it. Self-publishing Hub City Survival was never intended to be anything but a limited print run. But, luckily for me, it turned out to be a bit more than that. And, in fact, I keep telling myself I’ll do “one final order” of a batch of books… but every so often there’s a demand, and I end up ordering more! In the wake of the surprising amount of attention the novella got, I decided to try and gently nudge it in the direction of a few media outlets. One of these outlets was a small newspaper with a focus on independent music, local events, and some literature, so I figured I’d be a shoe-in–but I was surprised when I was met with “we don’t really do self-published books”. Of course, this is fine–they can write about whatever they please, and my book didn’t fit their criteria. But I found the focus on independent music and local arts contrasted with their rejection. Independent creators in other media were fine, but apparently writing can only be good if it’s pre-approved by an industry professional. If you post your stories online, nobody thinks twice. If you write a blog post, nobody thinks less of you. But when you decide to put them into print of your own volition? The conversation changes. For those of us whose ideas don’t direct toward a conventional reading audience, self-publishing is a viable option. For those of us who are niche writers, self-publishing is an excellent option. For those of us who don’t want their ideas to direct toward a specific audience, self-publishing is, arguably, the best option. And some people just like the freedom they’re allowed through self-publishing. Why is there such a difference between self-marketing written work versus other forms of craft or art? Please don’t get me wrong! I am extremely appreciative of all the reception Hub City Survival has gotten over the years, and I wouldn’t change anything–rejections included. These are merely questions I ask when I see the reactions when self-publishing is mentioned. I understand minor skepticism that surrounds self-publishing, especially when it comes to editing and re-writing. But, I also feel the self-publishing market has gotten a bad reputation, needlessly. My next book, Mushroom and Anchovy, is being crowdfunded through Inkshares which, essentially, is a self-publishing platform. If it reaches a certain amount of pre-orders, the book will be published through a professional publishing house, but I’m still the one directing the progress. I have developed an audience through Hub City Survival, which will help me with my campaign, and, in my opinion, can be a useful way for other writers to gauge interest in their projects. It is my hope that one day I will be able to professionally publish one of my books through a well-known house, but I don’t want to treat my little “misfit” projects like they’re inferior. They’re still projects I worked hard on and poured a lot of myself into. They still mean a lot to me. That’s Mushroom and Anchovy, that’s Hub City Survival. And that’s why they get self-published instead. Please follow and like...

Read More